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How To Pass the Contractor Exams and Get Your Contractors License

Why we do it

Do you work in residential construction or commercial construction? While this type of work can be quite fulfilling at any level, the reality is that you probably won’t make the kind of income you desire or need without a contractors license.

Reason one

Obtaining a contractors license in the state(s) in which you work can literally change your life as it will take your income to a whole new level and allow you to be your own boss.

Reason two

If you don’t quite know how to get a contractors license, don’t worry! You’ve landed on a website that is going to give you all the information you need to have.

Still not convinced? Here is another one:

Reason three

We have decades of experience in the construction industry and we will teach you exactly how to get your contractors license in any state.

The 12 NASCLA States that Accept the National NASCLA Exam for Commercial (Some Allow for Residential work to be performed under the NASCLA License):

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  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • Aarizona
  • Georgia
  • Louisiana
  • Mississippi
  • Nevada
  • North Carolina
  • Oregon
  • South Carolina (for both residential and commercial)
  • Tennessee
  • U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Utah
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia

 

The NASCLA Examination is one of the most popular exams to pass because it allows you to have projects in more than one state as long as you follow the other requirements for each state. However, even if you pass the NASCLA Examination, this will only allow you to work on certain types of projects, and not others, in the states it is accepted.

For example, in Georgia, you will also be required to take the PSI Examination, including a contractor business law section and a part for the specific type of contractor license you are seeking. Georgia and other states also requires specialty licenses for certain types of construction such as cell towers, above ground storage tanks, greenhouses, cooling towers, concrete structures, fireplaces, dams, outdoor structures like retaining walls or swimming pools, tennis courts, loading docks, skylights, and the list goes on and on.

This is why it is so important to first learn about the specific requirements for the state(s) in which you intend to work and decide the exact type of project(s) on which you want to work (at least initially). Some states require a General Contractor License Exam specific to that state. Some states require you to pass a Contractor Business Law Exam. Below, you’ll see a list of state specific links that will give you specific information for each state.

Don't Be Daunted By the Process – The Information That You Will Find On This Site Will Answer All Of Your Questions!

With a contractors license, you'll get more lucrative work, bigger projects, better quality clients, and a steadier more dependable income.

You’ll also avoid problems with the law in the state(s) in which you work.

What Do You Gain By Getting a Contractors License?

You’ll gain the immediate trust of homeowners and business owners who actually have the budget to hire a top notch professional contractor.

You’ll become a respected member of your community because you’ll be seen as someone who knows how to get things done!

If you’ve ever thought of getting your contractors license before but were too daunted by the process to try, don’t worry — that is all about to change!

We’re going to help you navigate the system, learn just what you need to know, gain the confidence you need to proceed, and avoid the pitfalls that people run into when they attempt to obtain their contractors license on their own with no expert help.

Every State Has Different Requirements

The first thing you need to know is that the requirements for contractor licenses and contractor exams in every state is different.

The rules and regulations are usually written into the statutory code for that particular state.

However, they are not always written in language that anyone other than a lawyer, or perhaps a politician, can understand! This is one of the major ways we help people.

We decipher this “code” for you and help you first understand exactly what forms you need, how to fill out those forms, where you need to send the forms, and then the test(s) you’ll need to pass. Most states also have multiple other requirements that you must comply with BEFORE you even apply for your license and this varies by state.

For example, you may need to provide a tax identification number, a license bond, proof of incorporation papers, proof of passing a background check, proof of certain types of insurance, personal identification, and citizen papers. Finally, we not only advise you on the paperwork you’ll need to submit for your state(s) and on how to pass the contractor exams and get your contractors license, we also help you understand contractor business law.

We Help You Pass Your Contractor Licenses Test(s)

First, we need to know that we have decades of REAL WORLD experience both in the construction and contractor business. On top of this, we’ve been helping people across many states pass their contractor exams for decades. Our instructors are extremely knowledgeable.

Our exam prep classes focus on exactly what you need to know to pass the tests so you don’t have to guess at what’s on the test and or wade through a lot of information that definitely won’t be on the test!

We also offer practice tests, online courses to help you pass the tests, online live streaming classes, and even one on one training sessions. In fact, while the vast majority of our students pass their tests on the first try, we offer a guarantee that if you don’t, we’ll work with you individually until you do!

You Have To Know the Contractor Rules For Your Particular State(s)

Without a contractors license, your income is severely limited. Most states have certain thresholds where a contractor license is required to legally work on a construction project of particular size and or scope. For example, in North Carolina, if a project cost exceeds $30,000, then you must have a contractors license to even bid on the project, let alone actually perform the work. Even if you are perfectly qualified and experienced on the type of work, if it costs more than $30,000, you still cannot legally work on the project. You also have to have a contractors license for any project involving heating, electrical, plumbing, or fire sprinklers in North Carolina.

The Easiest Way To Get a Contractors License In Any State


The easiest way to pass your contractors exam(s) and get your contractor license(s) in your state(s) is take one of our contractor exam prep courses and order our contractor exam prep materials. Yes, there are big thick books on Amazon and in bookstores that supposedly teach you how to pass the exams and how to get your contractors license. However, those types of materials tend to be way too generic to really help much and all they end up doing a lot of the time is frustrating people. We give you SPECIFIC information for the SPECIFIC exam(s) in the SPECIFIC state(s) you be taking. We hold your hand through the process and make it relatively painless and easy. We’re not saying you won’t have to work at it — you will of course — but if you are willing to learn the specific materials we give you, you’ll almost certainly pass your exams and become a licensed contractor in your state(s).

Our No Pass No Pay Guarantee

If by some outside chance you fail your exam on the first time after taking our prep course(s), we offer an iron clad No Pass No Pay Guarantee! What is this? We commit to working directly with you one on one until you master your weaknesses and can pass your contractor exam(s). For some people, this may be a particular subject they didn’t quite understand. For others, it may simply be a test taking or confidence problem. However, no matter what the problem is, we will continue to help you and give you personal instruction until you pass your exam(s). Your success is our success!

Now, scroll back up and click on your particular state(s) to find out the specific requirements for your state(s).